Classes & Programs

Enrichment Classes

Monday

Taiko
Latin Embroidery

Tuesday

Japanese Cooking and Bento      Click here for Flyer Fall2017
Latin cooking

Wednesday

Nihon buyo
Soroban
Passport to Latin American Arts and Crafts

Thursday

Kendo

Friday

Latin Dance      

Taiko

grades K to 12
starts Sep 12
contact Lara Embry

Taiko is a musical tradition with deep roots in Japanese culture. The Taiko drums that are used in our classes were made by a very dedicated group of parents some years ago. There are only so many drums and therefore, the size of the classes are limited. Because Taiko takes time to master, it is a progressive class. Due to the increased number of students who are staying in Taiko, openings for Taiko will only be available to students in second grade. Therefore, the child would start in second grade, then moves on to the intermediate and advanced classes in third through fifth grade, if there is room in the classes.

Application fliers will be distributed to all 2nd grade classes and must be submitted by the due date. After all timely applications have been received there will be a lottery, if necessary, to fill the small number of open spots in beginning taiko with first graders.

Also note: a crew of parents is NEEDED to take out, set up, then put away the drums for each class. It goes quickly with an organized crew. Sign up for this essential job.


Latin Embroidery

grades pre-K to 5
starts Aug 29
contact Sra Ordaz and Sra Carmen

Learn how to embellish a servilleta with yarn exported from Oaxaca, Guadalajara, and Mexico City.


Japanese Cooking

grades 1 to 5
starts Aug 30
contact Kumiko Sasamori

Students learn how to cook simple Japanese food and how to prepare cute Japanese bento box.


Latin Cooking

grades pre-K to 5
starts Aug 30
contact Sra Ordaz and Sra Carmen

Do you want your child to try and explore new foods? Would you like to learn gastronome from around Latin America? This is a fun hands-on and delicious class.


Nihon Buyo

grades K to 12
starts Oct 12
contact Mari Miyashrio

Nihon Buyo is generally known to be a style of dance originating from Kabuki dances, most of which were made during the Edo Period.  Nihon Buyo literally means Japanese dance, ‘Nihon’ meaning Japan and ‘Buyo’ meaning dance. This class is taught by Bando Hidesomi,who has been training since age three through the Bando School and later received the title of Shihan (Master’s Degree) in Japan. Nihon Buyo offers classes from kindergarten through fifth grade. An advanced class is also offered to middle schoolers and high schoolers with prior experience.


Soroban (Japanese Abacus)

grades 1 to 5
starts
contact Marika Kawano

Soroban is a human-powered “natural calculator” that helps students increase their: math understanding, concentration, memorization, mathematical and reasoning skills. Concepts reinforced include: carrying & borrowing, 5 and 10 and complementary numbers, relationship between concrete & abstract numbers, and mental calculation.


Passport to Latin American Arts and Crafts

grades pre-K to 5
starts Aug 31
contact Sra Ordaz and Sra Carmen

Learn artisan art from around Latin American. We’ll talk about culture, geography, and history. We will do a Dia del Los Muertos Calavera that will be displayed at the Halloween Carnival Altar, and a personalized mini piñata just in time for Posada celebration. And on the last day, we’ll celebrate with snack size food from around Latin America.


Kendo

grades K to 5
starts Sep 1
contact Mari Miyashrio, Shizuki Yamashita

Kendo is a way to discipline the human character through the application of the principles of the katana (Japanese sword,) to mold the mind and body, cultivate a vigorous spirit, and through correct and rigid training, strive for improvement in the art of Kendo, hold in esteem human courtesy and honor, associate with others with sincerity and to forever pursue the cultivation of oneself.

illustration kendo

Check out the kendo flyer for more info.


Latin Dance

grades K to 5
starts TBD
contact


Storytelling in Spanish

grades pre-K to 5
starts Sep 2
contact Sra Ordaz and Sra Carmen

We will read, learn, act, express, play and have fun. We will have presentations for family and friends to see.

Exchange Programs


Mexico Exchange

The SIP exchange program began in 1985 and was started by Madeline Ehrlich, the founder of Advocates for Language Learning National. El Marino has enjoyed more than 20 years of academic and cultural exchange between El Marino SIP students and students from Guadalajara, Mexico.

The exchange program comprises two separate exchanges each year and each is four weeks long. Our students spend one month with a host family in Guadalajara and attend school at either Colegio La Calma or Instituto Copernico and, in reciprocation, each child and his or her family hosts a student from one of the Guadalajara schools for one month.

Each student is matched with a host family and spends four weeks attending school, exploring the sights and experiencing the culture of their home away from home. Two adult chaperones, usually parents or school administrators, accompany each group. This is a wonderful capstone opportunity for students who elect to participate. Most return from their adventure with a broader view of the world, a deeper appreciation for the differences and similarities between cultures, great stories, new friends and family, and tremendously enhanced language skills.

For many SIP students the exchange program is a capstone experience to their language learning at El Marino. While in Guadalajara, our students have the opportunity to be part of a Mexican family, experience school in a foreign country, try new foods, absorb a rich culture, and see some of sights of the host country.

Students apply for the program in late winter or early spring while they are in 4th grade. Before applications are distributed, 4th graders are invited to an assembly to kick off the following year’s exchange. Parents of interested 4th graders will also be invited to a meeting around this same time. It’s not too early to begin discussing the possibility with your child. There are also plenty of opportunities to be involved in the exchange program for families who chose not to send their child to Guadalajara. The program is always looking for families who are willing to host a child or a chaperone for a month.


Japan Exchange

The Japanese Immersion Program Exchange started with its first exchange trip to Japan in 1997. Four students from the first graduating class of the Japanese Immersion Program, along with Horiba Sensei and a chaperone, headed off to Kaizuka, Japan for a two week stay. Since that first successful trip, we have had many more trips to Kaizuka Japan with the 5th grade Japanese Immersion Class.

The Japan Exchange Group is always busy planning and conducting fundraisers. Traveling to Japan is expensive, and funds are raised to cover chaperone costs, group expenses and other administrative expenses. Individual student expenses, such as airfare and spending money, are not covered by the fundraising.

Look for the famous confetti eggs at the Fiesta La Ballona, Tupperware parties, Sees chocolate bars sales, Car Washes, Rummage Sales, Japanese Soap sales, and lots of other creative fundraising ideas!